Tag Archives: Iran–Iraq War

The Night Bus

Standard

The Night Bus (Persian: اتوبوس شب, Otobus-e Shab‎) is the name of an Iranian motion picture directed by Kiumars Pourahmad. It was made in 2006 and released in 2007.

The Night Bus

The Night Bus

The film, which is in sharp monochrome, relates the story of a twenty-four-hour-long journey of two young Iranian soldiers (Issā and Emād) and a civilian driver (Amu Rahim) transporting thirty-eight Iraqi prisoners of war, taken from behind the Iraqi line, to a garrison inside Iran. From the details one is informed that the Iran–Iraq War has entered into its third year. The film masterfully depicts the deep inhumanity of acts of war amongst nations by showing the shared humanity of the combatants on both sides. Some scenes of the above-mentioned garrison are reminiscent of those of the 1965 British film The Hill.

In the film, the Iranian characters speak Persian amongst themselves, with a variety of regional accents — emphasising the national character of the war effort, but broken Arabic, comprehensible to a Persian-speaking person, when addressing the Iraqi prisoners. The Arabic dialogues of the film, by the prisoners, are accompanied by Persian subtitles.

  • Khosrow Shakibā’í: Amu (Uncle), and at times Amu Rahim (Uncle Rahim) and Āghā Joon (Sir my soul), the bus driver. Although it is never stated, the film suggests that Amu Rahim’s own son is an Iranian POW in Iraqi hands.
  • Mehrdād Sedighiān: Issā (Jesu[disambiguation needed ]), the 18-year old Iranian soldier from Abadan; he is often called by Amu Rahim, somewhat derogatorily, as Bach’cheh (Child, Juvenile); as the emotional bond between the two strengthens, Amu calls Issā once as Issā Jān (Issā my soul). Issā has entered into military service at the age of 16, when his father was killed while defending Abadan; at the outset of the War, the father had sent his entire family, with the exception of Issā, to his brother’s home in another Iranian city for safety.
  • Amir-Mohammd Zand: Emād, the second and the more senior Iranian soldier/officer. Emād had just started studying in London when the War broke out, whereon he volunteered as an officer in the army.
  • Elnāz Shākerdoust: Reyhāneh, wife of Emād. She and Emād, along with her parents, had been living in London. When Emād volunteered to serve in the War effort, she returned with Emād to Iran, leaving the parents in London.
  • Mohammad-Reza Foroutan: Fārouq (Fārouq Abd al-Amir), an Iraqi POW whose father is Iraqi and mother Iranian. It turns out that two of Fārouq’s brothers are on the run from the henchmen of Saddam Hossein and a third brother and a sister are in Saddam Hossein‘s jails, awaiting execution.
  • Kourosh Soleimani: Sirvān (Sirvān Foād), an Iraqi POW from Iraq’s Kurdistan and a recent medical graduate. Prior to the War, Sirvān had been studying medicine in London; he had only returned to Iraq for bringing his family into safety, but forcefully drafted into the Iraqi army.
  • Ahmad Kavari: An Iraqi POW and a member of Iraq’s Baath Party.
  • Mehrān Nātel: An Iranian tank driver from Esfahan (this as betrayed by his Esfahani accent) who despite having fought valiantly and helped capturing some tanks from Iraqis, seems to be unable to think ill of any one; he appears to live mentally in an Utopian world of his own. Although Mehrān Nātel’s appearance in the film is very brief, he shows himself as another extraordinarily talented young actor of the Iranian cinema.

Directed by Kiumars Pourahmad

Ekhrajiha

Standard
Masoud Dehnamaki iranian journalist فارسی: مسع...

Masoud Dehnamaki iranian journalist فارسی: مسعود دهنمکی ردبیر و مدیرمسؤول و فیلم‌ساز (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ekhrajiha (Persian: اخراجی ها‎, English: The Outcasts) is a 2007 Iranian film, written and directed by Masoud Dehnamaki, set during the Iran–Iraq War.

The film is Dehnamaki’s first feature film, after he directed two documentaries about social problems in Iran. Dehnamaki is known to be one of Iran’s most extreme ultra-conservatives, with his viewpoints being extremely controversial.

The film had also broken all box-office records in Iran, earning nearly 1 billion toman only twenty-eight days after its release and finishing its run with over 2 billion toman. Additionally the film is one of few Iranian war movies in which the heroes are extremely flawed and shown to commit acts often viewed as “immoral” by authorities in Iran.

The movie, set in 1988 begins when Majid (Kambiz Dirbaz), a local thug from Southern Tehran is freed from prison along with his friend Amir (Arzhang Amirfazli). To avoid embarrassment, Majid and his friends have told his family and neighborhood that Majid is returning from Hajj at Mecca. His lie though is revealed after some mistakes by Amir and his other friend Bayram (Akbar Abdi).

Majid has been attempting to show that he is an honorable man so he can marry Narges (Niousha Zeyghami), the daughter of Mirza (Manouchehr Azar); a pious man in the neighborhood. Bayram on the other hand wants to marry Majid’s sister Marzieh (Negar Forouzandeh). In order to impress Narges and her father, Majid decides he must go to the front and fight against the Iraqi Army.

Majid, Amir, Bayram, Mostafa (Alireza Osivand), Bijan (Amin Hayai) and a local musician sign up for the war and head off to training. Here they are met with opposition by Haj Saleh (Mohamad Reza Sharifinia) and Kamali (Ghasem Zareh), who question their faith as Majid and his friends don’t pray, gamble, use foul language, smoke and use drugs. They are eventually kicked out of training but with the help of an acquaintance from the neighborhood named Morteza (Javad Hashemi) they are allowed to go back to training.

Morteza attempts to “reform” Majid and his friends as they go through the last days of the Iran–Iraq War.